I decided to go bold…

Yellow stucco

Yellow stucco

…but not overboard. I hemmed and hawed with myself on whether to go yellow or coral. In the end, the yellow won. I started out with a more intense hue, but it seemed too garish for the picture.  The vividness overpowered the softer wash colors, so I toned it down with yellow ocher, making it closer to a gold but still quite bright.  It is a bit more yellow than this, but I just don’t seem to have that photoshop touch to show it more exactly.  I placed a spot of red in it with the chimney top.  The flue was grey in the photo, but I have the feeling it was a later addition, so I didn’t feel bad taking some artistic license with it too.

In addtion, I straightened up the entryway.  The right side had a bit of a lean which started to bother me.

A couple of days later I still like it.  Perhaps the next one will be red.

Back to Germany

Preliminary ink-up

Preliminary ink-up

I picked out a simpler photo for this session with the Elegant Writer pen.  I liked the reference photo for the stonework and the little side portico and slate shingles.  I can’t remember where I took it, but it must be part of a much larger building.  I don’t think it was a castle as we only visited one intact one (Marksburg, maybe) and I just don’t think this is it.  In reality many of the medieval castles had colorfully painted stucco over the stonework.  I didn’t know that before we visited, but it is fun to imagine all of the beautiful colors that the buildings once were. They were not wall flower colors either.  I got the impression that reds and yellows were common.  All I had ever seen were dreary looking buildings in the movies but I think Medieval people appreciated color as much as we do, and for those that could afford it, it was a visible show of wealth.  I thought if I toned down the stonework here, it would turn out much better.  It does look like, in fact, that part of the portico wing was stuccoed over at one time.  Maybe it was colored at one time too.

Washed line drawing

Washed line drawing

I’m coming to the conclusion that with these pen drawings, less may be more.  It is too easy to get bogged down in details and then the ink lines all run together when you add the water. One thing I like is the unpredictability of the color shift.  It adds a level of spontaneity to the drawing that sometimes is lacking in my drawings.  I know that if you lift off some of the wet spot you can achieve a shift more to the pink, but I am kind of liking the unexpected aspect.  It is too easy for me to get over controlling and this is good practice for keeping my hands off.  I plan to use more subtle watercolors on this, more like the first one.  The second one was okay by the end, but I think I ended up removing too much of the randomness with the afterwork.  The sky looks good to me, so that part of the drawings seems to be working out.  I do find skies difficult.