Mr. Turtle linocut

Box turtle linocut

When I decided to make another linocut after the Japanese maple leaf one, I once again fell to the pleasure of my box turtle friends.  I recently determined that there are actually 2, if not three Mr. Turtles wandering my flower beds.  I knew for sure that I had at least two when I was able to definitely identify two separate shell patterns.  One had the markings more splotchy and melded together than the other, which had rather distinct stripes.  There was a size difference too.

I think the one depicted here is Mr. Turtle Jr. with the slashy stripes.  Mr. Turtle Sr.  is quite a bit bigger. and has the more muddled markings.

Mr. Turtle III is marked with a combination of the two others.  Also, his size just seemed to be off of what I recalled of the other two.  Smaller maybe and he seemed to be leerier of me than the others, pulling himself inside his shell when I approached.  The others just kind of look up at me and stay out as long as I don’t try to pick them up.  Whatever.  He will get to know I mean him no harm if He continues to visit.

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The Waymire Building Finished

Watercolored Waymire

The Waymire Building is finished. While not as colorful as the previous Boise businesses, it is appealing none the less.  The red trim makes a nice accent to the white building.  The shop “Hyde & Seek” takes up much of the first floor and is filled to the brim with an eclectic variety of items.  We enjoyed wandering through and making a few purchases the last time we were there.

Next up is a local house portrait.It’s a lovely brick two story and it’s owner is moving away after many years of residence.

Waymire Building

Pencil drawing

All inked

After doing all of that abstract flow paint work because of the acrylic class I took, I decided to head back to Boise for some architectural subject matter.  I chose the Waymire building in the Hyde Park area of the North End.  Constructed in 1909, it was designed by John E. Tourtellotte who also designed the Idaho State Capitol building, St. John’s Catherdal in Boise and numerous other major buildings in Idaho.

The Waymire now houses a delightful little antique/speciaty shop named Hyde & Seek on the first floor.  Did you notice the wings that hang on either side of the doorway?  Fun and eclectic items abound inside the entrance.  We cetainly enjoyed our little excursion there and even bought a couple of small things to bring home.

Japanese maple linocut

Japanese maple print

After I sold several linocut prints this spring, I decided to cut a few new ones.  I wanted to experiment with some new printing papers at the same time, so I ended up making this new piece and printing it and the replacement ones for sale simultaneously.

I have a lovely Japanese maple tree outside my front door which provided the inspiration for this piece.  One year we had a very early spring and the tree fully leafed out way too soon.  When we had the inevitable later frost, the tree was severely damaged and I though I might lose it.  I did some serious pruning on it and after a few years of looking on the funky side, it is now back to normal and I look at it with pleasure every day.

A second round of tile pour painting

6×6 with a floral motif

A darker forest 4×4

I tried to be a bit more subtle yet directed with these next tile pour paintings.  I went away from all primary colors and white to purple and green in the smaller one.  To me, it suggests a deep forest with a creek running through it.

For the larger tile, I was going for a more floral theme.  There is a way to manipulate the poured paint with a string and I tried it here.  I kind of messed up with the initial pull so it looks more like a vase with a flower, but I still ended up liking it.  I then added two flower shapes around the vase/flower with a more correct string pull.

This is fun and I plan to make more of them in the future.

Pour painting on canvas

Dirty pour

It’s called a dirty pour when you layer all of your colors into one pouring cup and then dump it all at once onto the art surface.  And that’s what I did for this one.  When I finished the tiles shown previously, I had a few ounces of each prepared color left over, so I put them all in one covered cup to store until my next class.  When I came back the next week, I proceeded to pour the whole cup onto the center of an 8×10 canvas and watch what happened as I tilted it back and forth until the paint mostly covered the surface.  By my good luck, there was just enough to reach most of the edges and spill over the sides.  Pretty interesting, huh.  You have less control over the color positioning this way (although you do have the option of what order colors are put into the cup and thus come out) but you can still manipulate the flow somewhat with popsicle sticks, straws, or a palette knife.

After it dried, I started painting the small amount of white space left on the edges and the top with the dark blue I had used to unify the canvas.  If you look closely, you can see it is almost done.  There is a small amount on the lower edge and the left side to finish.

As you will see, the next pours on tile were a bit more purposeful, but still had a wonderful unpredictableness about them.  I don’t do much abstract work, but this is pretty interesting and I might enjoy it as a change of pace from the more detailed pen and watercolor work.

 

Something new from my acrylic class – Pour painting

6×6 tile

4×4 tile

I am taking this new acrylic class mostly to find out about the varieties of acrylics currently available and what additional mediums and varnishes are being used.  There hasn’t been much emphasis on realistic work, but I am still happy with all the new things I have learned.

We moved from the Gelli plates to pour painting, something I had barely for even heard of before, much less tried for myself.  You put acrylic paint into a fluid medium, add a small amount of silicon, and then pour it over a substrate like canvas or commercial tile.  Some artists use it over built up mixed media, too.  The paint is rather like a thick lotion you pour onto your surface, but dries completely flat.  As the different color mix, the silicon helps them form into various shapes due to different specific gravities for each color.  You can do some manipulation to guide the formations, but I am rather limited at this point in my technique.  For these, I just poured 4 different colors on a 4″ and 6″ tile and then tilted them back and forth until the paints mixed and moved out to the edges.  Don’t ask me about the chemistry involved.  I rather like my first efforts, but I know there is a lot of experimentation to be done.  I am already happier with the pieces I have subsequently worked on.  Youtube pour painting and you will see some pretty incredible things.

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